Authentic or Not: Spittoon Edition

Due to the widespread use of chewing tobacco in the 19th century, spittoons were a common fixture in public areas, including railroad stations. Their intended purpose was collecting tobacco juice spit from a distance; so typically, they were built heavy and low to the ground, with a wide mouth or funneled top. Sometimes, these rugged fixtures were enameled, but most importantly, they had to be durable and hard to tip over if kicked or shoved.

Authentic railroad spittoons can be hard to find, and reproductions are very common. Reproductions are typically made of brass, have a vase-like shape and are usually marked with railroad company logos on the front. Sometimes, reproductions may be decades old, but they were still created to be railroad memorabilia - and most likely have not been used as a spittoon.

So now it's time to test your skills! In the photo below, which spittoons are the reproductions?

<p>The shorter green, silver and brass-colored spittoons are the real deal. The taller, vase-shaped spittoons are replicas.</p>

The shorter green, silver and brass-colored spittoons are the real deal. The taller, vase-shaped spittoons are replicas.

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